Flaco Jimenez steps back in time with duos other half

Fred Ojeda, left, and Flaco Jimenez record as Los Caporales at the Blue Cat Studio. Their cantina-sounding album, the product of sessions in which Jimenez became emotional, will be released this summer. Photo: Billy Calzada, Staff / © 2012 San Antonio Express-News

Flaco Jimenez is back in the studio consumed by a labor of love.  Not to work on a new solo project (he’s vowed those off) but rather to dig deep into his past with the long-extinct Los Caporales, a duo with singer and bajo sexto player Fred Ojeda.

They are the embodiment of the spirit of their boyhood heroes, Los Alegres de Teran.


Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/life/article/Flaco-Jimenez-steps-back-in-time-with-duo-s-other-3627938.php#ixzz1xjfEIDyq

 


Polka on stolen instruments

It’s always the same conversation.

“How can you be Hispanic?” someone asks. You’re way too white and your name is Nathaniel Miller. Nathaniel Andrew Miller.

It’s not the name I chose for myself, I try to explain. My mom’s mistake was marrying a white guy and taking his name.

“Yeah, but how are you Hispanic?” they always ask.

I then end up explaining my family history. My mother’s maiden name was Rocha. Her middle name is Guadalupe. My grandmother’s maiden name was Ramos. To drive it home, I usually go further on down the family tree.

But none of that matters. My mom married a white Oregon boy stationed in San Antonio while with the Marines. Now I have a light skin tone. Love does strange things to people.

Even after my birth, mom’s family members would ask her why she gave me the name she did.

“What ever happened to good Mexican names like Jose and Pepe?” They asked her upon hearing my new name. It didn’t matter what they thought, she said; she loved my name and said it was her gift to me.

I told her if she wanted to give me a gift, she should have gotten me a bicycle….

Read more:Polka on stolen instruments- Odessa American Online.


Reunion of accordion icons to honor their father

Juan Tejeda is betting big that the stars have aligned this weekend.

If all goes as planned, the co-founder and producer of the 31st annual Tejano Conjunto Festival en San Antonio will have pulled off a fantastic coup: the historic reunion of brothers Flaco Jimenez and Santiago Jimenez Jr.

That’s expected at the finale at Rosedale Park on Sunday. Both award-winning musicians are on the bill with separate shows and will (according to Tejeda, Flaco and Santiago) play together at some point to honor their dad.

“It’s going to be history,” said Santiago.


Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/entertainment/article/Latin-Notes-May-17-2012-3562816.php#ixzz1v9HpDnrf

 


Flaco Jiménez: Will the ‘King of Conjunto’ finally play with his brother Santiago Jiménez Jr.?

The 31st annual TCF has attractions for all tastes: the young, the old, and the fusion-minded. But none of those attractions shine more than the potential for three, five, 10, 15 minutes, or whatever Flaco Jiménez and his brother Santiago Jiménez Jr. could give us.

The brothers, children of Santiago Jiménez Sr. and two of the greatest living legends of conjunto in their own right, haven’t recorded together since 1960, and haven’t played together since 1982, when they shared the stage with their father at the very first Tejano Conjunto Festival in 1982. While Santiago is ready for the gig, Flaco was surprised when I asked him about it.

“They have sort of a long duel, an estrangement of sorts,” said festival director Juan Tejeda. “Santiago is willing to do it, but I spoke mainly to Flaco’s son about doing a polkita or two in tribute to their father. That’s the plan, and we all hope it happens.

Read the whole article here: “Flaco Jiménez: Will the ‘King of Conjunto’ finally play with his brother Santiago Jiménez Jr.? 


Master Accordionist to Perform in Concert at Trinity University

SAN ANTONIO – Master accordionist Eva Ybarra and music scholar Juan Tejeda will visit Trinity University as part of Trinity University’s Legends of Texas Border Music Series. Tejeda, an instructor at Palo Alto College, will present “Xicanismo and Tejano/Conjunto Music: Local Music, Global Identity, and Vision” at 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 20, in the Ruth Taylor Recital Hall. That evening, Ybarra will be accompanied by her conjunto group in concert at 7:30 p.m. in Laurie Auditorium. Both events are free and open to the public; tickets or reservations are not required.

Before teaching at Palo Alto College, Tejeda taught bicultural studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He has written and lectured on the history and socio-cultural significance and importance of Tejano and conjunto music. He is also the founder of the Tejano Conjunto Festival.

Ybarra teaches her style of music at two colleges in San Antonio and performs locally with her mariachi and conjunto groups. She has toured in Washington, Canada, New York City, and performed at the San Antonio Conjunto Festival for the last 15 years. She has received numerous recognitions and awards throughout the years, most recently with her induction into the 2010 Conjunto Hall of Fame in San Benito, Texas. Her style and music complexity compares to Esteban Jordan, Paulino Bernal, and Oscar Hernandez.

For more information on the Legends of Texas Border Music Series, contact Mary Anthony at 210-999-8441.

 

Master Accordionist to Perform in Concert at Trinity University | Trinity University | a mySA.com blog.


Los Aguilares: A bittersweet night of puro conjunto

It has been two years since the death of accordionist and co-founder Emilio Aguilar from complications of Alzheimer’s disease. He was 70.

“It’s important to continue my dad’s legacy,” said Miguel Aguilar, who plays keyboards. “And of course, my uncle (Genaro) still has his voice. He’s still active, and he wants to continue so we’re going to respect that … continuing is what my dad would really, really have wanted us to do.”

Emilio Aguilar was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s when he was 55. But even at the end of his life, when he couldn’t recognize his button accordion “and didn’t know what to do with it,” he could still keep time.

“He never lost his beat. My mom would tune in the Radio Jalapeño station (KEDA-AM), and he would always stomp his foot. He would just smile,” Miguel recalled. “That’s a good memory.”

Los Aguilares’ life story is right out of a movie.

Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/entertainment/article/Los-Aguilares-celebrate-52-years-and-a-good-2588432.php#ixzz1kc19WUt3

 

A bittersweet night of puro conjunto – San Antonio Express-News.


Busy 2012 for TexManiacs

Max Baca still has miles to go.

The leader of the Grammy-winning Los TexManiacs says 2012 is shaping up to be a great year for the conjunto rock ‘n’ rollers with upcoming gigs in China, a series of dates with Los Lobos (including a Fiesta stint) and a new Smithsonian Folkways album, “Texas Towns & Tex-Mex Sounds.”

Read more: http://www.mysanantonio.com/entertainment/article/Latin-Notes-2367664.php#ixzz1g5BkkjBg